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Major developments for Southbank

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04 Feb 2016

Plans have been unveiled by regeneration specialist Citu for the major residential redevelopment of a former foundry site, located south of Leeds Dock and has been vacant since 2005.

The news comes as the £80m Tower Works development, which is central to the regeneration of the South Bank, is recommended for conditional approval with a June start date scheduled.

The proposed new development refered to as Left Bank relates to the former Hydro Aluminium Foundry site which lies between Clarence Road and the River Aire and opposite Citu's Low Fold development.

Citu, which is also behind the eye-catching Greenhouse project in Beeston, is proposing 205 zero carbon standard homes at Left Bank, arranged in 13 blocks and made up of a mixture of flats, live - work units and houses. The proposal also includes associated private, shared communal and public open space, alongside community and café uses.

As at the Low Fold scheme, the homes on Left Bank would be owned, managed and operated by the residential occupiers within a development using a purpose formed community interests company. The scheme would feature a digital platform that allows the homeowner the ability to control energy remotely via a desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone.

Citu was formed in 2004 by Chris Thompson as a property development business looking to build communities that reduce their impact on the environment.

The Left Bank proposal will be showcased in a pre-application presentation next week (11 February 2016) when councillors are also expected to back Carillion's plans for Tower Works.

Tower Works plans include a residential development of 160 units, ranging from one-bedroom flats to five-bedroom townhouses; 128,000 sq ft of office space and retail space of up to 4,000 sq ft. At ground level, adjacent to public routes, shops, restaurants and cafes and drinking establishments will occupy a further 16,000 sq ft.

Tower Works is being designed by architects Jestico + Whiles and landscape architects Oobe and engineering firm WSP.